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The Most Common Mistake Made When Selecting A Pressure Sensor

 

sample pressure sensorSelecting a pressure sensor for your application sounds simple, but with the huge amount and range of performance options, it's easy to get overwhelmed with what the best model is for your application.

We have seen situations where designers choose the most expensive and most accurate part for their needs at the beginning of the design. It's the path of least resistance. However, once production arrives and cost reduction is required, most especially for high volume applications, the established, set-in-stone design specification does not allow for a lower cost option without sacrificing performance. The engineer is stuck or needs to initiate a costly redesign.

To prevent this situation from occurring, we suggest starting with the widest tolerance (and hence lower cost) pressure sensor. Through your testing and evaluation phase, you may find that the lower tolerance models can work. In particular, if you have the ability to provide your own calibration or additional signal conditioning, you may discover that an acceptable specification is met. Furthermore and most importantly, it is significantly easier to move up the price/performance chain than going down it. Flexibility is designed in should performance requirements tighten in the future.

Once the target accuracy is determined for a product, designers should then look at sensor options in conjunction with their ability to add value (such as calibration, temperature compensation, signal conditioning). This is the classic make versus buy question which must be asked. We can help with the answer!

If you have an application for a pressure sensor and have limited resources on finding a solution, tell us your needs and let us do the work for you.

Comments

One must never lose sight that the sensor is part of a system—the materials compatibility with what you're measuring and its environment, communication with the rest of the system, total allowable uncertainty to get the needed product quality (thus leading to the maximum allowable uncertainty and resolution for the sensor), etc. The more you keep the system in mind, the fewer gotchas there will be.
Posted @ Tuesday, November 22, 2011 2:05 PM by Bob Benjaminson
The "Try Our Sensor Selector Tool" link does not work.
Posted @ Wednesday, February 26, 2014 11:27 AM by Steve White
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